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YA Book Club POSTPONED! Due to unforeseen circumstances, we have had to cancel this Saturday's YA book club meeting. We will reschedule and post it here and on our social media as soon as we can. 

Ithaca History

Abandoned Upstate New York

Abandoned Upstate New York

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Accompanied by the faint hum of crickets and the sounds of wind whistling through shattered glass, photographer Nicholas Long ventures into complete darkness in order to shed light on how remarkable life once was. With only a camera and flashlight in hand, he travels fearlessly through underground tunnels, scales ladders caked in rust, and squeezes through narrow passages in search of obsolete technology and relics to share with the world. Many of his works, included in this book, provide a raw and nostalgic insight of the past, all the while revealing just how unsettling it can be traveling alone through the ignored and forgotten territories of Upstate New York. From abandoned houses and shops, to the monumental factories of St. Regis Paper Mill and Abbass Food Corporation, Nick has only scratched the surface of what lies secluded from public eye. Follow Nick as he wanders through these desecrated locations that have been buried in time, in search of a more vivid understanding into abandoned Upstate New York.
Agitators: Three Friends Who Fought for Abolition and Women's Rights

Agitators: Three Friends Who Fought for Abolition and Women's Rights

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From the intimate perspective of three friends and neighbors in mid-nineteenth century Auburn, New York--the "agitators" of the title--acclaimed author Dorothy Wickenden tells the fascinating and crucially American stories of abolition, the Underground Railroad, the early women's rights movement, and the Civil War.

Harriet Tubman--no-nonsense, funny, uncannily prescient, and strategically brilliant--was one of the most important conductors on the underground railroad and hid the enslaved men, women and children she rescued in the basement kitchens of Martha Wright, Quaker mother of seven, and Frances Seward, wife of Governor, then Senator, then Secretary of State William H. Seward.

Harriet worked for the Union Army in South Carolina as a nurse and spy, and took part in a river raid in which 750 enslaved people were freed from rice plantations. Martha, a "dangerous woman" in the eyes of her neighbors and a harsh critic of Lincoln's policy on slavery, organized women's rights and abolitionist conventions with Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Frances gave freedom seekers money and referrals and aided in their education. The most conventional of the three friends, she hid her radicalism in public; behind the scenes, she argued strenuously with her husband about the urgency of immediate abolition.

Many of the most prominent figures in the history books--Lincoln, Seward, Daniel Webster, Frederick Douglass, Charles Sumner, John Brown, Harriet Beecher Stowe, William Lloyd Garrison--are seen through the discerning eyes of the protagonists. So are the most explosive political debates: about women's roles and rights during the abolition crusade, emancipation, and the arming of Black troops; and about the true meaning of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

Beginning two decades before the Civil War, when Harriet Tubman was still enslaved and Martha and Frances were young women bound by law and tradition, The Agitators ends two decades after the war, in a radically changed United States. Wickenden brings this extraordinary period of our history to life through the richly detailed letters her characters wrote several times a week. Like Doris Kearns Goodwin's Team of Rivals and David McCullough's John Adams, Wickenden's The Agitators is revelatory, riveting, and profoundly relevant to our own time.

Barns of New York: Rural Architecture of the Empire State

Barns of New York: Rural Architecture of the Empire State

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Barns of New York explores and celebrates the agricultural and architectural diversity of the Empire State--from Long Island to Lake Erie, the Southern Tier to the North Country--providing a unique compendium of the vernacular architecture of rural New York. Through descriptions of the appearance and working of representative historic farm buildings, Barns of New York also serves as an authoritative reference for historic preservation efforts across the state.

Cynthia G. Falk connects agricultural buildings--both extant examples and those long gone--with the products and processes they made and make possible. Great attention is paid not only to main barns but also to agricultural outbuildings such as chicken coops, smokehouses, and windmills. Falk further emphasizes the types of buildings used to support the cultivation of products specifically associated with the Empire State, including hops, apples, cheese, and maple syrup.

Enhanced by more than two hundred contemporary and historic photographs and other images, this book provides historical, cultural, and economic context for understanding the rural landscape. In an appendix are lists of historic farm buildings open to the public at living history museums and historic sites. Through a greater awareness of the buildings found on farms throughout New York, readers will come away with an increased appreciation for the state's rich agricultural and architectural legacy.

Blacks in the Adirondacks: A History

Blacks in the Adirondacks: A History

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Blacks in the Adirondacks: A History tells the story of the many African Americans who settled in or passed through this rural, mountainous region of northeastern New York State. In the area for a variety of reasons, some were lifetime residents, while others were there for a few years or months--as summer employees, tuberculosis patients, or in connection with full- or part-time occupations in railroading, the performing arts, and baseball.

From blacks who settled on land gifted to them by Gerrit Smith, a prosperous landowner and fervent abolitionist, to those who worked as waiters in resort hotels, Svenson chronicles their rich and varied experiences, with an emphasis on the 100 years between 1850 and 1950. Many experienced racism and isolation in their separation from larger black populations; some found a sense of community in the scattered black settlements of the region. In this first definitive history, Svenson gives voice to the many blacks who spent time in the Adirondacks and sheds light on their challenges and successes in this remote region.

CAYUGA'S DAUGHTERS: 100 NOTABL

CAYUGA'S DAUGHTERS: 100 NOTABL

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As late as the 1920s, when Eleanor Roosevelt's daughter Anna enrolled in Cornell's School of Agriculture, her grandmother complained that "Girls who went to college were very apt to be 'old maids' and become 'bookworms, ' a dire threat to any girl's chance of attracting a husband." In today's higher education landscape, when women earn fully half the degrees granted by Cornell in every category, this modest volume reminds readers of those devoted daughters of their Alma Mater whose cumulative strength pushed open the door for women in intellectual life, in politics, in industry - and includes the remarkable and influential who followed in their footsteps. It is not meant to provide a comprehensive nor complete academic reference, but rather an accessible distillation that recognizes many of the authentic heroines we already know, and introduces more than a few we ought to know.
CORNELL 77

CORNELL 77

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On May 8, 1977, at Barton Hall, on the Cornell University campus, in front of 8,500 eager fans, the Grateful Dead played a show so significant that the Library of Congress inducted it into the National Recording Registry. The band had just released Terrapin Station and was still finding its feet after an extended hiatus. In 1977, the Grateful Dead reached a musical peak, and their East Coast spring tour featured an exceptional string of performances, including the one at Cornell.Many Deadheads claim that the quality of the live recording of the show made by Betty Cantor-Jackson (a member of the crew) elevated its importance. Once those recordings--referred to as Betty Boards--began to circulate among Deadheads, the reputation of the Cornell '77 show grew exponentially.With time the show at Barton Hall acquired legendary status in the community of Deadheads and audiophiles.Rooted in dozens of interviews--including a conversation with Betty Cantor-Jackson about her recording--and accompanied by a dazzling selection of never-before-seen concert photographs, Cornell '77 is about far more than just a single Grateful Dead concert. It is a social and cultural history of one of America's most enduring and iconic musical acts, their devoted fans, and a group of Cornell students whose passion for music drove them to bring the Dead to Barton Hall. Peter Conners has intimate knowledge of the fan culture surrounding the Dead, and his expertise brings the show to life. He leads readers through a song-by-song analysis of the performance, from New Minglewood Blues to One More Saturday Night, and conveys why, forty years later, Cornell '77 is still considered a touchstone in the history of the band.As Conners notes in his Prologue: You will hear from Deadheads who went to the show. You will hear from non-Deadhead Cornell graduates who were responsible for putting on the show in the first place. You will hear from record executives, academics, scholars, Dead family members, tapers, traders, and trolls. You will hear from those who still live the Grateful Dead every day. You will hear from those who would rather keep their Grateful Dead passions private for reasons both personal and professional. You will hear stories about the early days of being a Deadhead and what it was like to attend, and perhaps record, those early shows, including Cornell '77.

CORNELL UNIVERSITY

CORNELL UNIVERSITY

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Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, was founded after the Civil War as a great experiment: a nonsectarian, coeducational institution where "any person can find instruction in any study."


In the mid-19th century, there were only a handful of colleges that accepted women and even fewer that were nonsectarian. The university charter specifically states that "persons of every religious denomination or of no religious denomination, shall be equally eligible to all offices and appointments." Today, with colleges of hotel management and labor relations added to the more traditional majors in liberal arts, engineering, business, agriculture, and architecture, Cornell - both an Ivy League university and state land-grant college - truly offers a diverse program of study for a diverse collection of students.

CORNELL: GLORIOUS TO VIEW

CORNELL: GLORIOUS TO VIEW

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In their history of Cornell since 1940, Glenn C. Altschuler and Isaac Kramnick examine the institution in the context of the emergence of the modern research university. The book examines Cornell during the Cold War, the civil rights movement, Vietnam, antiapartheid protests, the ups and downs of varsity athletics, the women's movement, the opening of relations with China, and the creation of Cornell NYC Tech. It relates profound, fascinating, and little-known incidents involving the faculty, administration, and student life, connecting them to the Cornell idea of freedom and responsibility. The authors had access to all existing papers of the presidents of Cornell, which deeply informs their respectful but unvarnished portrait of the university.Institutions, like individuals, develop narratives about themselves. Cornell constructed its sense of self, of how it was special and different, on the eve of World War II, when America defended democracy from fascist dictatorship. Cornell's fifth president, Edmund Ezra Day, and Carl Becker, its preeminent historian, discerned what they called a Cornell soul, a Cornell character, a Cornell personality, a Cornell tradition--and they called it freedom.The Cornell idea was tested and contested in Cornell's second seventy-five years. Cornellians used the ideals of freedom and responsibility as weapons for change--and justifications for retaining the status quo; to protect academic freedom--and to rein in radical professors; to end in loco parentis and parietal rules, to preempt panty raids, pornography, and pot parties, and to reintroduce regulations to protect and promote the physical and emotional well-being of students; to add nanofabrication, entrepreneurship, and genomics to the curriculum--and to require language courses, freshmen writing, and physical education. In the name of freedom (and responsibility), black students occupied Willard Straight Hall, the anti-Vietnam War SDS took over the Engineering Library, proponents of divestment from South Africa built campus shantytowns, and Latinos seized Day Hall. In the name of responsibility (and freedom), the university reclaimed them.The history of Cornell since World War II, Altschuler and Kramnick believe, is in large part a set of variations on the narrative of freedom and its partner, responsibility, the obligation to others and to one's self to do what is right and useful, with a principled commitment to the Cornell community--and to the world outside the Eddy Street gate.

FINGER LAKES MEMORIES

FINGER LAKES MEMORIES

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Finger Lakes Memories takes a long, mesmerizing look back at a land of 11 lakes, a land of monasteries and mansions, a U.S. president, abolitionists, women s rights activists, Mark Twain, early aviation, and superb universities. Featuring the work of early-20th-century photographer George Bentley Corby, the book reflects the remarkable scenic beauty of the area before commercial and residential development. Poignant and often zestful photographs of farm labors, school chums, and small-town life emerge from a region where, like welcoming hands, the Finger Lakes beckon all to their safe solitudes, there to be inspired, comforted, educated, and encouraged. It is doubtful there is another book that so totally and vividly captures the everyday life of the era."
GHOSTS AND HAUNTINGS OF THE FI

GHOSTS AND HAUNTINGS OF THE FI

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From spooky state parks to real-life haunted houses, Ghosts and Hauntings of the Finger Lakes tells the stories behind the most supernatural sites around the shores of New York's famous Finger Lakes. Local paranormal investigator Patti Unvericht takes you on a journey to places such as the Elmira Civil War POW Camp, thought to be inhabited by the restless spirits of casualties of the war, to the State Theatre in Ithaca and even the tourist-friendly Geneva on the Lake, rumored to be haunted by past guests who have expired while staying at the historic hotel.
HAUNTED ATLAS OF WESTERN NEW Y

HAUNTED ATLAS OF WESTERN NEW Y

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Do you dare to follow along on a haunted jaunt through Western New York's supernatural locations? Move away from the ghost stories around the campfire and seek out the strange and unusual for yourself with the Haunted Atlas of Western New York. Join local writer, historian, paranormal researcher, and owner of Spook-Eats as she takes you to haunted cemeteries, museums, roads, schools, theatres, and restaurants (with a few cryptids thrown in just for fun). Explore over 130 haunted locations throughout the region, complete with walking and driving tours, a spooky bucket list, and coordinates to create the perfect haunted journey.
HIDDEN HISTORY OF THE FINGER L

HIDDEN HISTORY OF THE FINGER L

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New York's Finger Lakes region is filled with compelling characters, tragic disasters and fascinating mysteries.


Famed daredevil Sam Patch, known as the "Yankee Leaper," thrilled audiences at Niagara Falls but took his last jump into t

INDOMITABLE FLORENCE FINCH: TH

INDOMITABLE FLORENCE FINCH: TH

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An American hero-long forgotten-finally gets her due in this riveting narrative. You will absolutely love Florence Finch: her grit, her compassion, her fight. This isn't just history; she is a woman for our times.
-Keith O'Brien, the New York Times bestselling author of Fly Girls

The riveting story of an unsung World War II hero who saved countless American lives in the Philippines, told by an award-winning military historian.
When Florence Finch died at the age of 101, few of her Ithaca, NY neighbors knew that this unassuming Filipina native was a Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient, whose courage and sacrifice were unsurpassed in the Pacific War against Japan. Long accustomed to keeping her secrets close in service of the Allies, she waited fifty years to reveal the story of those dramatic and harrowing days to her own children.
Florence was an unlikely warrior. She relied on her own intelligence and fortitude to survive on her own from the age of seven, facing bigotry as a mixed-race mestiza with the dual heritage of her American serviceman father and Filipina mother.
As the war drew ever closer to the Philippines, Florence fell in love with a dashing American naval intelligence agent, Charles Bing Smith. In the wake of Bing's sudden death in battle, Florence transformed from a mild-mannered young wife into a fervent resistance fighter. She conceived a bold plan to divert tons of precious fuel from the Japanese army, which was then sold on the black market to provide desperately needed medicine and food for hundreds of American POWs. In constant peril of arrest and execution, Florence fought to save others, even as the Japanese police closed in.
With a wealth of original sources including taped interviews, personal journals, and unpublished memoirs, The Indomitable Florence Finch unfolds against the Bataan Death March, the fall of Corregidor, and the daily struggle to survive a brutal occupying force. Award-winning military historian and former Congressman Robert J. Mrazek brings to light this long-hidden American patriot. The Indomitable Florence Finch is the story of the transcendent bravery of a woman who belongs in America's pantheon of war heroes.
ITHACA

ITHACA

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Ithaca, New York has often been called "the Hollywood of the East," growing from farms to factories to Cornell University--Ithaca's history is an interesting and broad one.


Nestled in the heart of the Finger Lakes, Ithaca was planned by surveyor Simeon DeWitt and incorporated in 1821 when steamboats signaled Cayuga Lake's heyday of commerce and recreation. Spectacular creeks and waterfalls powered grist, plaster, carding, and other mills. From farms, merchants, and mills, Ithaca's industries grew to include the famous Thomas-Morse Aviation Company and Morse Chain Works. By 1914, Wharton Studios was producing silent films in this "Hollywood of the East." Such notable residents as actress Irene Castle, the Tremans, and community leader James L. Gibbs called Ithaca home. Ithacans became known for community involvement early on. St. James AME Zion Church served as a stop on the Underground Railroad, and Elizabeth Beebe built a mission for needy Rhiners. Ezra Cornell and Andrew D. White realized their ideal of education when Cornell University opened in 1868, followed in 1892 by the Ithaca Conservatory of Music, which became Ithaca College in 1931. Students protested segregation in front of Woolworth's 30 years later, and echoes of this idealism can still be found here today.

ITHACA NEW YORK: THE CITY WITH

ITHACA NEW YORK: THE CITY WITH

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Sundaes are us, and they have been pleasuring our collective senses ever since 1892, when an enterprising Ithaca, New York soda fountain proprietor accessorized a scoop of ice cream with sweet syrup and candied cherry, then named it after the Sabbath. For well over a century, the ice cream sundae has been a symbol of our abundance and appetite, our ingenuity, and our never-lost youth. In their assembly, sundaes acquire personality not only through their combination of ingredients, but through the history that they witness. Author Michael Turback recounts 125 years of sundae history with a fascinating buffet of popular lore and a wickedly delicious collection of recipes.
ITHACA RADIO

ITHACA RADIO

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From Long Island to Fiji, college students flocked to the sleepy little town of Ithaca to learn the how-tos and how-not-tos of broadcasting. From that influx came some of the future leaders and celebrities of the broadcasting industry. Television stars were born here, and some of radio s future stars were nurtured to succeed in an industry that impacts the daily lives of Americans. Ithaca s rich broadcasting history includes two college radio stations and several locally owned and operated stations. From the Greaseman to Keith Olbermann, Ithaca was the launch pad for numerous successful careers in music, talk, news, business, and satellite radio. Through vintage photographs, Ithaca Radio shares a history of local radio and some of the great voices that have called Ithaca home."
Murder and Mayhem in the Finger Lakes

Murder and Mayhem in the Finger Lakes

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The pristine waters of the Finger Lakes inspire tranquility, but the region has not been spared a history of high-profile murders. George Chapman's execution for killing a hostler in a drunken rage drew one of the largest crowds in Seneca County's history. Charles Sprague was the only person from Yates County to be executed and the last person electrocuted at Auburn Prison after shooting a neighbor in a dispute over potatoes. A plea of insanity did not save James Williams from the electric chair after murdering an elderly man and attempting to rape a teenage girl. In the Feedbag Murder, the body of a missing man was found in a canal, and his friend was acquitted of the murder despite confessing to the crime years later. Author R. Marcin explores the gruesome history of homicide in the Finger Lakes.

SHAPING A CITY: ITHACA, NEW YO

SHAPING A CITY: ITHACA, NEW YO

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Picture your downtown vacant, boarded up, while the malls surrounding your city are thriving. What would you do?

In 1974 the politicians, merchants, community leaders, and business and property owners, of Ithaca, New York, joined together to transform main street into a pedestrian mall. Cornell University began an Industrial Research Park to keep and attract jobs. Developers began renovating run-down housing. City Planners crafted a long-range plan utilizing State legislation permitting a Business Improvement District (BID), with taxing authority to raise up to 20 percent of the City tax rate focused on downtown redevelopment.

Shaping a City is the behind-the-scenes story of one developer's involvement, from first buying and renovating small houses, gradually expanding his thinking and projects to include a recognition of the interdependence of the entire city--jobs, infrastructure, retail, housing, industry, taxation, banking and City Planning. It is the story of how he, along with other local developers transformed a quiet, economically challenged upstate New York town into one that is recognized nationally as among the best small cities in the country.

The lessons and principles of personal relationships, cooperation and collaboration, the importance of density, and the power of a Business Improvement District to catalyze change, are ones you can take home for the development and revitalization of your city.

Spooky New York: Tales of Hauntings, Strange Happenings, and Other Local Lore

Spooky New York: Tales of Hauntings, Strange Happenings, and Other Local Lore

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Pull up a chair or gather round the campfire and get ready for thirty creepy tales of ghostly hauntings, eerie happenings, and other strange occurrences in New York. Set in the Empire State's big cities, historic towns, rugged lakes, and sparsely populated backwoods, the stories in this entertaining and compelling collection will have readers looking over their shoulders again and again. New York's folklore is kept alive in these expert retellings by master storyteller S. E. Schlosser and in artist Paul Hoffman's evocative illustrations. Readers will meet the White Lady of Rochester, dance to the rival fiddlers in Brooklyn, hear otherworldly voices in the Catskills, and run into the things that go bump in the night on Long Island--or simply feel an icy wind on the back of their necks on a warm New York evening. Whether read around the campfire on a dark and stormy night or from the backseat of the family van on the way to grandma's, this is a collection to treasure.
SUMMER IN A GLASS: THE COMING

SUMMER IN A GLASS: THE COMING

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New York's Finger Lakes is home to the country's fastest-growing wine region, and each year millions of tourists spill into the tasting rooms of its wineries. Filled with fun and likable characters, Summer in a Glass brings this burgeoning area to life and captures its exciting diversity--from its immigrant German winemakers to its young, technically trained connoisseurs, from classic Rieslings to up-and-coming Cabernet Francs. ...Dawson [composes] a useful travel guide, lessons in Wine 101, and, most important, a reminder of what makes wine so alluring. A fast, engaging read for wine lovers. --Library Journal
SURROUNDED BY REALITY: 100 THI

SURROUNDED BY REALITY: 100 THI

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There is a popular bumper sticker in this Upstate New York town that reads, Ithaca: 10 Square Miles Surrounded by Reality. The sentiment surely has something to do with the compelling history, eccentric characters, and quirky charm of this intellectually advantaged, culturally progressive, geographically isolated place. After you've browsed through this updated edition of a local classic, you will better understand the bumper sticker's message - Ithaca is almost too good to be true. Fascinating tidbits and trivia in purposely random sequence (with generous cross-references) create a ready-to-explore trail of knowledge about Ithaca and its environs, informing and entertaining, correcting myths and misconceptions, mostly revealing an unexpected treasure trove that brings a culture and a place into sharp focus.
WALL OF WONDER: CORNELL WOMEN

WALL OF WONDER: CORNELL WOMEN

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Net proceeds support the Cornell Society of Women Engineers' K-12 Outreach initiatives to advance STEM education and inspire future leaders.

Learn more about the book and access free coloring pages and read-along activities at https: //swe.cornell.edu/wallofwonder.html

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In September 2019, only one of Forbes' one hundred innovative leaders was a woman ("America's Most Innovative Leaders"). Throughout history, women have been breaking boundaries in technology, but recognition has been few and far between. Lack of recognition has left young girls and aspiring women without role models, thus contributing to the gender gap in technical fields. With this book, we hope to increase visibility of female innovators. Wall of Wonder celebrates Cornell University alumnae who have made significant impacts on society through science, technology, and engineering. In addition to showcasing the breadth of opportunities a technical education can offer, these women share stories of resilience, leadership, and ardor for all ages.