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Odyssey Bookstore will be closed on Thursday, November 26th, for Thanksgiving. 

If you place an online order after store hours this Wednesday or anytime on Thursday, it will not be processed until Friday morning when we reopen. Thank you!

Ithaca History

Abandoned Upstate New York

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CAYUGA'S DAUGHTERS: 100 NOTABL

CAYUGA'S DAUGHTERS: 100 NOTABL

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As late as the 1920s, when Eleanor Roosevelt's daughter Anna enrolled in Cornell's School of Agriculture, her grandmother complained that "Girls who went to college were very apt to be 'old maids' and become 'bookworms, ' a dire threat to any girl's chance of attracting a husband." In today's higher education landscape, when women earn fully half the degrees granted by Cornell in every category, this modest volume reminds readers of those devoted daughters of their Alma Mater whose cumulative strength pushed open the door for women in intellectual life, in politics, in industry - and includes the remarkable and influential who followed in their footsteps. It is not meant to provide a comprehensive nor complete academic reference, but rather an accessible distillation that recognizes many of the authentic heroines we already know, and introduces more than a few we ought to know.
CORNELL 77

CORNELL 77

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On May 8, 1977, at Barton Hall, on the Cornell University campus, in front of 8,500 eager fans, the Grateful Dead played a show so significant that the Library of Congress inducted it into the National Recording Registry. The band had just released Terrapin Station and was still finding its feet after an extended hiatus. In 1977, the Grateful Dead reached a musical peak, and their East Coast spring tour featured an exceptional string of performances, including the one at Cornell.Many Deadheads claim that the quality of the live recording of the show made by Betty Cantor-Jackson (a member of the crew) elevated its importance. Once those recordings--referred to as Betty Boards--began to circulate among Deadheads, the reputation of the Cornell '77 show grew exponentially.With time the show at Barton Hall acquired legendary status in the community of Deadheads and audiophiles.Rooted in dozens of interviews--including a conversation with Betty Cantor-Jackson about her recording--and accompanied by a dazzling selection of never-before-seen concert photographs, Cornell '77 is about far more than just a single Grateful Dead concert. It is a social and cultural history of one of America's most enduring and iconic musical acts, their devoted fans, and a group of Cornell students whose passion for music drove them to bring the Dead to Barton Hall. Peter Conners has intimate knowledge of the fan culture surrounding the Dead, and his expertise brings the show to life. He leads readers through a song-by-song analysis of the performance, from New Minglewood Blues to One More Saturday Night, and conveys why, forty years later, Cornell '77 is still considered a touchstone in the history of the band.As Conners notes in his Prologue: You will hear from Deadheads who went to the show. You will hear from non-Deadhead Cornell graduates who were responsible for putting on the show in the first place. You will hear from record executives, academics, scholars, Dead family members, tapers, traders, and trolls. You will hear from those who still live the Grateful Dead every day. You will hear from those who would rather keep their Grateful Dead passions private for reasons both personal and professional. You will hear stories about the early days of being a Deadhead and what it was like to attend, and perhaps record, those early shows, including Cornell '77.

CORNELL UNIVERSITY

CORNELL UNIVERSITY

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Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, was founded after the Civil War as a great experiment: a nonsectarian, coeducational institution where "any person can find instruction in any study."


In the mid-19th century, there were only a handful of colleges that accepted women and even fewer that were nonsectarian. The university charter specifically states that "persons of every religious denomination or of no religious denomination, shall be equally eligible to all offices and appointments." Today, with colleges of hotel management and labor relations added to the more traditional majors in liberal arts, engineering, business, agriculture, and architecture, Cornell - both an Ivy League university and state land-grant college - truly offers a diverse program of study for a diverse collection of students.

CORNELL: GLORIOUS TO VIEW

CORNELL: GLORIOUS TO VIEW

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In their history of Cornell since 1940, Glenn C. Altschuler and Isaac Kramnick examine the institution in the context of the emergence of the modern research university. The book examines Cornell during the Cold War, the civil rights movement, Vietnam, antiapartheid protests, the ups and downs of varsity athletics, the women's movement, the opening of relations with China, and the creation of Cornell NYC Tech. It relates profound, fascinating, and little-known incidents involving the faculty, administration, and student life, connecting them to the Cornell idea of freedom and responsibility. The authors had access to all existing papers of the presidents of Cornell, which deeply informs their respectful but unvarnished portrait of the university.Institutions, like individuals, develop narratives about themselves. Cornell constructed its sense of self, of how it was special and different, on the eve of World War II, when America defended democracy from fascist dictatorship. Cornell's fifth president, Edmund Ezra Day, and Carl Becker, its preeminent historian, discerned what they called a Cornell soul, a Cornell character, a Cornell personality, a Cornell tradition--and they called it freedom.The Cornell idea was tested and contested in Cornell's second seventy-five years. Cornellians used the ideals of freedom and responsibility as weapons for change--and justifications for retaining the status quo; to protect academic freedom--and to rein in radical professors; to end in loco parentis and parietal rules, to preempt panty raids, pornography, and pot parties, and to reintroduce regulations to protect and promote the physical and emotional well-being of students; to add nanofabrication, entrepreneurship, and genomics to the curriculum--and to require language courses, freshmen writing, and physical education. In the name of freedom (and responsibility), black students occupied Willard Straight Hall, the anti-Vietnam War SDS took over the Engineering Library, proponents of divestment from South Africa built campus shantytowns, and Latinos seized Day Hall. In the name of responsibility (and freedom), the university reclaimed them.The history of Cornell since World War II, Altschuler and Kramnick believe, is in large part a set of variations on the narrative of freedom and its partner, responsibility, the obligation to others and to one's self to do what is right and useful, with a principled commitment to the Cornell community--and to the world outside the Eddy Street gate.

CURIOSITIES OF THE FINGER LAKE

CURIOSITIES OF THE FINGER LAKE

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The Finger Lakes region is known for its beauty, but look carefully and you will discover some of New York's other abundant--and unusual--treasures. The cliffs of Excelsior Glen are scattered with ancient Indian pictographs, and Bluff Point conceals the ruins of an unknown civilization. The wine industry has its own strange stories; discover why one wine producer was banned from using his own name. Among the oddities of the Finger Lakes region are the world's largest pancake, a slice of Susan B. Anthony's seventy-eighth birthday cake and the anecdote of the boy who accidentally caught an eight-pound trout with his nose. Join author Melanie Zimmer and uncover these and other curiosities and strange tales of the Finger Lakes.
ECCENTRIC FINGER LAKES: A CURI

ECCENTRIC FINGER LAKES: A CURI

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Eccentric Finger Lakes is an armchair travel guide of sorts to the odd, the offbeat, the hidden and mysterious, and the just plain unexpected in New York's Finger Lakes region. The author explores often overlooked stories and treasures, bizarre legends and best-kept secrets. The book is filled with curious characters -- religious zealots, mediums, daredevils, explorers, suffragettes, inventors, benefactors, artists and writers, winemakers and chefs, bootleggers, and scoundrels - a ready-to-explore trail of knowledge about Finger Lakes history and culture you won't want to miss. Whether you follow it straight through, or pick out individual stories as the mood strikes, you're in for captivating reading.
FINGER LAKES MEMORIES

FINGER LAKES MEMORIES

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Finger Lakes Memories takes a long, mesmerizing look back at a land of 11 lakes, a land of monasteries and mansions, a U.S. president, abolitionists, women s rights activists, Mark Twain, early aviation, and superb universities. Featuring the work of early-20th-century photographer George Bentley Corby, the book reflects the remarkable scenic beauty of the area before commercial and residential development. Poignant and often zestful photographs of farm labors, school chums, and small-town life emerge from a region where, like welcoming hands, the Finger Lakes beckon all to their safe solitudes, there to be inspired, comforted, educated, and encouraged. It is doubtful there is another book that so totally and vividly captures the everyday life of the era."
HIDDEN HISTORY OF THE FINGER L

HIDDEN HISTORY OF THE FINGER L

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New York's Finger Lakes region is filled with compelling characters, tragic disasters and fascinating mysteries.


Famed daredevil Sam Patch, known as the "Yankee Leaper," thrilled audiences at Niagara Falls but took his last jump into t

ITHACA

ITHACA

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Ithaca, New York has often been called "the Hollywood of the East," growing from farms to factories to Cornell University--Ithaca's history is an interesting and broad one.


Nestled in the heart of the Finger Lakes, Ithaca was planned by surveyor Simeon DeWitt and incorporated in 1821 when steamboats signaled Cayuga Lake's heyday of commerce and recreation. Spectacular creeks and waterfalls powered grist, plaster, carding, and other mills. From farms, merchants, and mills, Ithaca's industries grew to include the famous Thomas-Morse Aviation Company and Morse Chain Works. By 1914, Wharton Studios was producing silent films in this "Hollywood of the East." Such notable residents as actress Irene Castle, the Tremans, and community leader James L. Gibbs called Ithaca home. Ithacans became known for community involvement early on. St. James AME Zion Church served as a stop on the Underground Railroad, and Elizabeth Beebe built a mission for needy Rhiners. Ezra Cornell and Andrew D. White realized their ideal of education when Cornell University opened in 1868, followed in 1892 by the Ithaca Conservatory of Music, which became Ithaca College in 1931. Students protested segregation in front of Woolworth's 30 years later, and echoes of this idealism can still be found here today.

ITHACA RADIO

ITHACA RADIO

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From Long Island to Fiji, college students flocked to the sleepy little town of Ithaca to learn the how-tos and how-not-tos of broadcasting. From that influx came some of the future leaders and celebrities of the broadcasting industry. Television stars were born here, and some of radio s future stars were nurtured to succeed in an industry that impacts the daily lives of Americans. Ithaca s rich broadcasting history includes two college radio stations and several locally owned and operated stations. From the Greaseman to Keith Olbermann, Ithaca was the launch pad for numerous successful careers in music, talk, news, business, and satellite radio. Through vintage photographs, Ithaca Radio shares a history of local radio and some of the great voices that have called Ithaca home."
ITHACA: A BRIEF HISTORY

ITHACA: A BRIEF HISTORY

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Calmly nestled among the glacial streams and hills of central New York, residents of Ithaca may find it hard to believe that their city began with a rocky start. Transient teamsters and salt barge workers gave the town a rowdy reputation in its pioneer days, and the fledgling village seemed doomed as the most isolated place on the Eastern Seaboard. Over the course of the nineteenth century, Ithaca s character swung like a pendulum
from debauchery to temperance, from boisterous vagrancy to religious fervor and reform. Though the town was hit hard by the Depression of 1837 and periodically ravaged by fire and flood, Ithaca survived to become a lively and bustling community and an important center of education, technological
innovation and cultural vibrancy. In this comprehensive history, Carol Kammen shows exactly why Ithaca is known as the Crown of Cayuga. "

SHAPING A CITY: ITHACA, NEW YO

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SILENT SERIAL SENSATIONS: THE

SILENT SERIAL SENSATIONS: THE

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The first book-length study of pioneering and prolific filmmakers Ted and Leo Wharton, Silent Serial Sensations offers a fascinating account of the dynamic early film industry. As Barbara Tepa Lupack demonstrates, the Wharton brothers were behind some of the most profitable and influential productions of the era, including The Exploits of Elaine and The Mysteries of Myra, which starred such popular performers as Pearl White, Irene Castle, Francis X. Bushman, and Lionel Barrymore. Working from the independent film studio they established in Ithaca, New York, Ted and Leo turned their adopted town into Hollywood on Cayuga. By interweaving contemporary events and incorporating technological and scientific innovations, the Whartons expanded the possibilities of the popular serial motion picture and defined many of its conventions. A number of the sensational techniques and character types they introduced are still being employed by directors and producers a century later.

SURROUNDED BY REALITY: 100 THI

SURROUNDED BY REALITY: 100 THI

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There is a popular bumper sticker in this Upstate New York town that reads, Ithaca: 10 Square Miles Surrounded by Reality. The sentiment surely has something to do with the compelling history, eccentric characters, and quirky charm of this intellectually advantaged, culturally progressive, geographically isolated place. After you've browsed through this updated edition of a local classic, you will better understand the bumper sticker's message - Ithaca is almost too good to be true. Fascinating tidbits and trivia in purposely random sequence (with generous cross-references) create a ready-to-explore trail of knowledge about Ithaca and its environs, informing and entertaining, correcting myths and misconceptions, mostly revealing an unexpected treasure trove that brings a culture and a place into sharp focus.